Best rappers of all time 2019

In fitting with the other composers on this list, British composer Anna Clyne has a list of awards and prizes that seem almost unachievable at her age! Some of those include a Grammy Award nomination in 2015 for her work Prince of Clouds, the Hindemith Prize in 2016, the Charles Ives Prize, and awards from ASCAP and SEAMUS, and, well, the list goes on. A student of the incredible Julia Wolfe, Clyne moved from the UK to New York City to continue her studies at the Manhattan School of Music with Wolfe and others. Drawing her influence from a wide range of creative mediums including art, theater, and contemporary dance, Clyne has been described as having an “uncommon gift and unusual methods.” Through her broad experiences and interests, Clyne has carved a truly fascinating and individual place in the world of contemporary classical music.

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them. 

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few select testimonials of Soundfly’s Modern Mix Techniques course directly from our students.

Classical music grants

Songwriters like me often draw from personal life and experience, or from the experiences of those around us; which is probably true of almost any writer in any literary format. But we may also get inspired by and invested in the characters in TV shows, films, and books as well. In fact, it is completely possible to get inspired by anything and everything in the world around you as a creative person. As long as you’re looking for it…

It sounded straightforward at first — to complete this challenge you had to open up that sample pack and let the sounds guide your music — easy. But these sounds just happened to be so funky and exciting right out of the box that I began to realize the real challenge here was to make something unique and personal and interesting enough to stand up to that original material!

At the opposite end of traditional form is through-composition — essentially a style of composition that doesn’t repeat sections of music, lyrics, and might not even repeat melodic themes. It could be argued that the lyrics of “All My Friends” is through-composed.

Both of the new videos were made against countless odds: “In the 1970s” because of all the impossible ideas we wanted to make real, and “Felicity” because we had to find a place to shoot all 15 Baccis at the same time with essentially no budget. Thankfully due to my employment at Roulette Intermedium in Brooklyn, I was able to get a day there to shoot, and Chris Shields, a filmmaker/writer/musician who I’ve admired for years, was completely instrumental in making that video work as well as it did, considering that we filmed it in six hours by the skin of our teeth. It was Chris’ natural eye for dynamism and lighting that made it look so amazing, as well as the insane post-production he did which made it look like an old VHS copy of an Italian movie. My dream came true!

In this edition of “Talking Points,” producer and beat maker Kaytranada talks about his grooves, his influences, and his upbringing, and we boil it down!

Quick grant applications

At the heart of the University of New Mexico is a small place affectionately named the Duck Pond (named, cleverly, for the abundance of ducks who frequent it). Here you can collect your thoughts and mediate to the sound of water and ducks quacking. It’s a great place to sneak away from the hustle and bustle of the city’s sounds and hear nature’s music.

Whitney Houston was a definitely a great singer and an animated, entertaining performer, sure; she makes the song glimmer, but that’s not the only ingredient. The instrumentals, the lyrics, the melodies and harmonies, all have to match, and be enjoyable too. In this song, melody clearly plays a really important role. 

This form is super common in classics and jazz standards. You start with a section, repeat it, move on to something else, and come back to that first idea again. Most recordings of standards like Gershwin’s “I Got Rhythm” use this form, sometimes featuring additional repetition to extend the song. Two other famous examples are “All I Have to Do Is Dream” by The Everly Brothers and “Yesterday” by The Beatles.

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So I wanted to pluck out a bunch of very famous songs from between the ’60s and ’80s where these stalwart rhythm-section warriors were able to eek out a few moments of their own in the limelight — those fleeting moments where any listener can catch the bass filling an iota of space very cleverly, or otherwise blending particularly well with the vocal, lead guitar, or other instrument. We’ll also examine the melodic techniques used in each case.